Graham Letter - Jacob Peart 1865

Graham Letter - Jacob Peart 1865

Graham Letter - Jacob Peart 1865

Graham Letter - Jacob Peart 1865

Graham Letter - Jacob Peart 1865
Joseph did escape form involvememnt in the Civil War in America, but Jacob and John Peart and Robert Wilkinson all served in the Union Army at the end of the war and immediately after. The following letter from Jacob to the Grahams and Pearts in New York State describes life in the army. It contains much news of the family back in England as well.
Durham Record Office Ref: D/X 1035/23

Okolona Mississippi June the 11th 65

My dear Friends
To again address you with a few more lines in answer to your letter or rather to Elizabeth* dated May 1th 65 I am happy to hear that you are ale (all) in good health and Enjoying the comforts of this sinful World it is one of the greatest that a man can enjoy in this World is good Health. I am glad to inform you that I am wele when I write this note. I have had very good health since I entered the army. I felt a little while we was moving from Eastport to this place I had the direah very bad and a little disorderd in my stomach but now I am quite well again there is a number of us that is sick in our regiment this southern climate uses a great many men up. A great many men leaves home never to see it again. O this war this cruel war it have raveaged the Country left many orphans and Widows but I think we living to see the end of it. The south is completely used up and they acknowledge they are whipt and if any man would be astonished that they could have carried on the war so long. They have very little or no provisions our government have to feed them or they would starve. Their ceities and towns where we have passed through is tore to pieces and most of the people gone. I suppose they was Rebels a great many of them been in the rebel army besides a number of them wile have got to their long home we are at the present time in a very pretty part of the country. We are close to the Mobile and Ohio railroad. We are not doing anything at the present time with the exception of standing camp guard. The Boys here is not very honest. When they get a chance they take chickens or turkeys or hogs and anything they can carry of(f) and they do not let the women alone. If they are not willing they force the thing and the citizens complain to headquarters and they put on a guard so if we want to get outside of the lines we have to get a pass. We are wele enough of (f) if one could be content but I cannot. I want to be home the war is ended and we are doing no good now in the field. Robert Wilkinson likes it much worse than I do. He hates it. We Enlisted to ride Cavalry but our regiment is ale (all) dismounted so that we nev er have had the privilige of rideing a govement horse. I suppose never wile(will). Now our regiment is ale scattered along the Mobile and Ohio railroad. We are at Okolona Mississippi we have not had any letters from home lately but when we got the last letters from them the folks was ale wele . I had a letter from Home stateing that our sister Elizabeth is dead. She died November the 12th by a miscariage. Mother feels very bad about her death. I felt very sorry when I read the letter she was ale the sisters that was left** to look after Mother and she would be a sort of a comfort to her besides helpin her when she was not able she have left one little Boy behind and he has been very sick he have got wele again John and Adam (and) Watson is (I) suppose is ale living with Mother Adam and Watson was both working in rookhope Watson is working at a brandon wales below boltburn. Adam is working at a painter by trade he is at that kind of work they write that mother is wearing down fast she thinks that the Journey to this Country wile be more than she wile be able to stand. They write they would come a year ago last spring but this cruel war scared them. They thought it would not be safe to come. I wrote that the war would not have any effect on them nor meddle with them in shape or form but I suppose the News concerning the war in England was dreadful. I told them they would do much better in the united states than they can do in England. There is more money to be made (here) by only working half their time and they wile breathe the free fresh air and not be buried in powder smoke and damps. I wrote for them to come if they could come though I wrote that if Mother was not able to stand the journey it would not be right to move her from home that it be better for one of them to stay at Home and take care of her so long as she lives. She cannot live long by course of years. She is getting pretty old yet I should like very wele to see her again in the flesh. Though we are a long ways parted in body yet I suppose we are often present in mind. No doubt but she wile (will) of have us in mind and wile wish to see us again. John writes the letters and he is excellent writer. I remember the time when Mother said she would never live to get any good of them two boys*** but people do not know what they may live to see. Ale (all) looks very dule and poor at allenheads. Allendale men is scattered all over the country. There is a great many of thenm in derwent. You must give my love to John and wife and the little girl**** . If John is got home***** tele (tell) him to write to me and let me know how you are ale getting along. If I knowd that John was not come home I would Write to him immediately. I have wrote a letter to John's wife a day or two ahead of this but I am sorry to say that I forgot to put a stamp on it and I thought it might not go and I thought I would write on to you I calculated to write you ale a letter at any rate in a few days. You must write home to Mother and tele them how you are moveing along in the state of New York the(y) complain of not receiveing any letters from you. Write and let them know where and what state you live in. we have plenty of the black race round this part of the country we have one cooking for our mess. He cooks for 20 men they feel glad to get inside of the union lines. We have good many of them in the regiment. Now dear friend I (am) about drawing this letter to close with giving my love and affections to you ale hopeing this may find (you) in perfect health. Robert sends his kind love to you ale desiring you to write soon when you receive this Note. Direct it to Jacob Peart Okolona first Provisional Company 7th Illinois Cavalry Mississippi. We May be gone from this place before this reaches you. You had better direct them to Galena post office Box 766. You can send your likenesses to Galena and then they will send theirs. If I go home soon I shall send ale of our likenesses so no more at Present from your Ever loveing Brother Jacob Peart

Write soon

*Elizabeth is John's wife.
**Exactly when their sister Mary died is not known. It might have been after the fever she had in 1858. The letter telling of the fever stated that she was recovering, but the writers tended to be optimistic in their letters.
***Her son Adam born about 1843 and Mary's son John born in 1848
****John's daughter
*****John is also in the Union Army.