Graham Letter - John Graham 1854

Graham Letter - John Graham 1854

Graham Letter - John Graham 1854

Graham Letter - John Graham 1854

Graham Letter - John Graham 1854
The next letter is undated but is appears to be a continuation of the previous letter.
Durham Record Office Ref D/X 1035/10

Dear Brother
I have give you a good account of the flow of emegration of Weardale I must return to our own humbel Family Intriests which I can write to you with more happiness than I sumtimes have don in regeard to a general view of all our hilths. Thomas has got very well again and William to is well And I think thair is nothing among none of thy Friends which is dangerous, thy daughter Jane Ann has been a little poorly but is a vast better again and my mother to is a vast weaker than she youst to be but she is abel to work her house work still and I have seen Joshua Stobbs and he says that his daughter Hannah is poorly but is not very ill and I know no more than aileth any thing. My Old Any betty is a vast weaker but is much about one any other way And her son John still thirtens to go to America but you need not look for him yet for I think he will never go time his Old mother is liven and I understand that he will have a good pay this year in the Burtreepastergrove mine and thir is som more of ous will do very well this year too. William will have a very good pay and myself and Christopher and Jonathan will do very well this year too. Thomas Millburn and Nicklas Padon* both have Masterwork this year and Joshua Stobbs is a masterman Washer at Burtreepaster mine and will have a bit pay too and as for Thomas Dalton. I do not no how he will come on this year and my brother Thomas has had bad work thease two or three years. He thinks that if you was whare he work whar a candel will not burn you would not be so much against him going to America and you think that you would not advice any of us to go to America well what would you think that you ware pleast in this Countery ware vitualin is so very high. The last year in April flour was as low as 1s and 8d per stoen and it rose to 2s and 6d in August and has been as high as 3s and 6d per stoen nearly all this winter and is 2s and 8d yet bacon is as high as 9d per lb Butter 11d per lb mutton is 7d per lb and has been as high as 8d ln and in fact ever thing is high. A good poney is as high as 15 to 20 and 25£ each and all other kind of horeses is equaly as dear and a good Milk Cow has been solin from 10 to 18 £ a peace. Sheep has been equaly as dear and in fact it has been the dearst year any of ous ever saw. And as for the Cholera I get the Newpeapers every week and I think is has totely left the Nation all togeather and I think it is nearly distroyed in the Eastern nations too and as for the War both Great Britian and France has combind with Turkey and has sent a great land force of Troops untio Turkey with two very great combined Fleets the one into the Black Sea and the other into the Baltic Sea and I think thay will force to russia to a pease she will never break more. And you must let me know weather you bought that peace of lanf you wonce wrote of so I must bring my letter to a close hopeing that it will find you and I care not how soon I was on a portion of land along with you and as many Frinds as would like to go and may he that siteth on the Sicekls of the Heavens soon hayl that prospriety
So I remain your ever sincer Brother
John Graham

* Nicholas Peadon and Thomas Dalton were brothers-in-law to John and Joseph. Nicholas married Hannah in 1852. Isabella and Thomas were married in 1841.